Posts Tagged ‘award winning literary fiction’

Visit Osgoode Hall, Toronto, Scene of The Osgoode Trilogy

Friday, December 19th, 2008

Osgoode Hall is a beautiful building in downtown Toronto, where the Ontario Appellate Court is located. When I began practising law in 1973, I can tell you that this was a very imposing building to all young lawyers. In fact the Law Society of Upper Canada was also housed there and that body oversaw the conduct of practising lawyers. And so, it is from that fact that I got the name of the first novel in The Osgoode Trilogy Conduct in Question.

Engraving by Walter R. Duff

If you would like a full tour visit www.osgoodehall.com

Osgoode Hall

Engraving by Walter R. Duff

ON THE MAGIC OF TRAVEL AND WRITING

Friday, December 12th, 2008

Magic in travel? You must be kidding! All we hope is to get there and back safely. When we consider the long lines, the cancelled flights, the rude security staff and the cramped seats on planes, don’t we all feel a lot like cattle being pushed and prodded from A to B? Now you’re asking for magic? Isn’t that a bit much?

Perhaps it is a tall order, but I’m thinking of those moments-and they may be few and far between-when suddenly, on your travels, you see or experience something that makes you view the world in a new way, from a different perspective. The world opens up and that, in itself, may be magical. Isn’t that the real purpose of travel-unless we’re talking about business trips? (more…)

Review of Conduct in Question, by Gina Robichaud, reviewer for Indigo, Chapters

Sunday, December 7th, 2008

This is a review of the first in The Osgoode Trilogy, Conduct in Question. I hope you are sufficiently intrigued to read it yourself. Then, maybe I will have hooked you on the next two, Final Paradox and A Trial of One.

A fascinating legal thriller…

Harry Jenkins is an estate lawyer and partner of Crane, Crawford and Jenkins law firm. First, his partner, Crawford, dies on the floor in his office while remember the love he once had with one of their clients, Marjorie Deighton. For Harry, things go from bad to worse and rather quickly.

Harry is asked to meet at Marjorie’s home; her intent is to review her will and consult with him about a meeting she is supposed to have earlier in the day. Along with his secretary, Harry visits the home of Ms. Deighton in late afternoon, only to find Ms. Deighton dead, lying on her bed. Harry believes that she must have died peacefully, but he is suspicious; there are just too many things going on that could make her passing a coincidence.

A mysterious man, Albert Chin, is referred to Harry for property acquisitions. Only, the properties are those surrounding the Marjorie’s estate. Plus, the names of the parties acquiring the properties seems fishy to him, as they are all numbered accounts. Money laundering? Harry allows himself to be blinded by the money, believing he may just live up to his wife’s expectations. But he knows the marriage is dead. Both have changed during their 20-year marriage; they no longer talk, nor are they in love. He also believes that his wife, Laura, is having an affair, mostly likely with her boss. Meanwhile, he fantasizes about the beautiful Natasha. And when he tries to deposit the checks from Chin into the trust, Mr. Mudhali, the manager of the bank, brings him to the office. It seems that Crawford had taken out a loan against the firm’s account. However, Harry believes that this is just as fishy as Mr. Chin’s acquisitions; it takes all the partners signatures for that loan, and Harry knows he’s never signed it.

And all the while, the serial killer, The Florist, is going around Toronto, judging and murdering women, using a knife to cut floral designs in their skin.

Harry believes that, somehow, they are all connected, even when he hopes they are not. But are they?

An incredible first novel by Canadian author, Mary E. Martin. Using her knowledge of the field, she writes an incredible novel filled with twists and coincidences. While the main character, Harry, goes through the motions of day-to-day life, he wishes his life were more exciting, more freedom, more love. And while I’m used to reading murder mysteries through the eyes of the detective, a criminal lawyer, this time, it’s through the eyes of an estate lawyer, one who usually deals with the passing of his clients, the grieving family and friends, wills, and estates. Not criminal. I liked the difference, and can’t wait to see what else Harry gets into. Also, I like how the author touched base on more than murder, money laundering, estates and wills. She adds abusive bullies, abused women, and very manipulative people. A fascinating combination. On to Book #2, Final Paradox.

A Romance

Tuesday, December 2nd, 2008

Venice is filled with canals and Squares surrounded by ancient palazzos-perfect places to linger and reflect. Narrow fog-ridden calles run like silken spider-webs connecting the Squares and taking me ever onward in exploration of the city and myself. I am a writer and a photographer and I am in love with Venice. I walk through an archway from which blind gargoyles stare down upon me. (more…)

Does Your Hometown affect your writing?

Friday, November 28th, 2008

I’m planning to write a series of articles about writing and the love of travel–which I do love. The first couple of articles start at home. All of us are affected by where we grew up and where we presently live. If we try, we can use that sense of place in our writing. Here’s the first article. Please come back soon for more.

DOES YOUR HOME TOWN AFFECT YOUR WRITING

Starting Out At Home

Before I launch on travels to “foreign” parts of the world, I want to think about what I am leaving behind-Toronto, Canada-and how it, my hometown has affected me as an individual and a writer.

I’m one of those people who, for the most part, has lived in one city, Toronto, all my life. Definitely, Toronto, of today, is not the city of my early days in the 1950’s where most of the population was descended from immigrants from the British Isles. In the intervening years, Toronto has benefitted hugely from the influx of immigrants from every country on earth so that now it is full of life enhancing, vibrant contrasts. And still, it remains a pretty peaceful place. In my lifetime, the city has changed dramatically. (more…)

A Trial of One, the missing Chapter 7

Tuesday, August 19th, 2008

Here’s another favorite character of mine, Dorothy Crawford, widow of Richard Crawford, Harry’s deceased law partner, Richard. Have you ever met women, who have no idea how to live when the husband dies, because they have been so dominated all their lives? When I started in law in 1973, I met a lot of them. Dorothy is about to get the shock of her life about her husband in this chapter.  Read on!  (more…)

CONDUCT IN QUESTION CONTEST

Sunday, April 13th, 2008

Between now and the end of April, you can enter this contest to win an endorsed copy of Conduct in Question, the first in the Osgoode Trilogy.

HOW? Answer this question.

What is Harry Jenkins’ wife’s first name?

Clue: you’ll find the answer by exploring the Conduct in Question section of this site and reading the first chapter.

THE FIRST CORRECT ANSWER WILL WIN A PERSONALLY ENDORSED COPY OF CONDUCT IN QUESTION, THE FIRST IN THE OSGOODE TRILOGY. 

Check this site on May 1st, where I will announce the winner.